Bubble and Squeak and a poem

Traditional Bubble and Squeak history

Bubble and squeak it is a dish of fried potatoes and other vegetables. But during 18th century it was a dish of fried meat and cabbage. The name ‘bubble and squeak’ was defined by Francis Grose in his dictionary in 1785. It is called bubble and squeak, beef and cabbage fried together because of its bubbling up and at the same time squeaking on the fire.

Mary Midnight1

Vegetarian Bubble and Squeak

bubble_and_squeak

Ingredients

  • 500g new potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters
  • 200g savoy cabbage, shredded
  • 20g butter
  • Salt and pepper
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • Handful of cheddar cheese, grated (optional)

Directions

Fill a saucepan with cold water. Bring to the boil and add the potatoes. Cook until soft. Take off the heat and drain.

Add the butter to the potatoes and mash until smooth.

Meanwhile, bring a small saucepan of water to the boil. Add the cabbage and cook until tender. Drain.

Mix the potato and cabbage together, add cheese and season lightly.

Heat oil in a frying pan and add ‘rissoles’ of the potato mix. Flatten with the back of a spatula. Cook until brown. Turn and continue to cook until the second side is browned.

Serve immediately.

This is traditionally a leftovers dish – you can just throw all the remaining cooked vegetables from a roast together. The one thing you will definitely need though is potatoes – either mashed or roasted enough that they can be squashed down.

  • This Bubble and squeak recipe is one you can make from scratch rather than leftovers. I think it’s absolutely delicious with the inclusion of cabbage – and let’s face it, there just aren’t enough yummy cabbage recipes around!
  • Cook the cabbage until it is cooked through – you really don’t want crunchy greens in this recipe.
  • If you want to make this a little more fancy, add a tablespoon of mustard to the mixture before pan frying.
  • This recipe was created by Ella Walsh for Kidspot, Australia’s best recipe finder.

www.kidspot.com.au

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK

I am a man who dwells alone,
Save only that I keep a dog,
Who eats my scraps up, orts and bone,
So that the creature shares my prog.
I had a boiled salt round of beef
On Monday, all to my own cheek,
Wheron my hunger sought relief
From day to day, for near a week.
Of cold boiled beef the daily round,
After a while begins to tire,
One longs for something nicely browned,
Or steaming from the genial fire.
And then the beef was getting dry;
But food away I never fling,
What can be done with it? thought I:
Bubble and Squeek, sir! – that’s the thing.
KING GEORGE THE FOURTH was not a dunce
At least in gastronomic lore;
Bubble and Squeak he tasted once;
And then he ate it evermore.
The King had oft on turtle dined,
As I have sometimes chanced to do,
We both, to think I am inclined,
The less enjoyed it of the two.
So large with what it fed on grew
My whetted appetite’s increase,
That ‘twas as much as I could do
To leave my dog a little piece.
And even when I gave him that,
I muttered in a doubtful mood,
“is this quite right now – what I’m at,
In giving you, Sir, Christian food?”
The dish at which I’ve pegged away,
So that it my interior fills,
Would that they had it this cold day,
The Brave on the Crimea’s hills!
They in the cannon’s mouth do not
The Bubble reputation seek,
But Glory find; their onset hot,
Leaves to the Russians all the Squeak.
But Bubble, not of empty air,
And Squeak that’s more than idle sound,
Soon may those gallant heroes share
At mess on Russia’s conquered ground!
Anon. Punch 1855. vol. XXVIII, p.10
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2 thoughts on “Bubble and Squeak and a poem

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